OECD-TIP Workshop - 17 and 24 June 2020

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    AGENDA WITH SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES (PDF)

     

    AGENDA (PDF)

     

    BACKGROUND REPORT

     

    Registration: To register for the virtual workshop, please contact Caroline Paunov (Caroline.Paunov@oecd.org) and Celia Valeani (Celia.Valeani@oecd.org)

     


    The Covid-19 pandemic has precipitated an unprecedented global crisis.
    Science, technology and innovation (STI) systems ultimately offer the only solutions –vaccines and treatments– that will allow returning to the pre-Covid-19 situation. At the same time, the pandemic and lockdown measures have adversely affected STI activities. Immediate effects on research institutions and universities include interrupted research projects due to limited access to research labs, reduced research mobility, re-orientation of health research to Covid-19 matters and funding constraints from reductions in income from foregone student tuition and industry demand for research support. For businesses, aside from disruptions to research and operations, sharp decreases in demand, liquidity constraints and supply chain disruptions threaten their very survival. However, there has been an unprecedented uptake and boost in innovative digital platforms, businesses and solutions. Participation in open science and open innovation initiatives addressing Covid-19 have sharply increased.

     

    The Covid-19 crisis will also have longer-term impacts on STI systems. Reductions in funding for R&D and innovation may result from debt overhangs and tighter public budgets for non-Covid-19 research and innovation. Reduced investments from businesses and investors can further undermine scientific production and the translation of scientific outcomes into products, services and solutions. These constraints may curtail the role of STI in contributing to environmental sustainability and broader Sustainable Developmental Goals (SDGs). The detrimental impact of the crisis on socio-economic development may increase efforts in dealing with environmental emergencies. Open science and innovation activities may receive a boost following their essential application and deployment to address the Covid-19 crisis. The digital economy is also likely to expand as lock-downs reshaped consumer demand and behaviour, possibly with long-term implications. The pandemic disproportionately affected businesses with traditional business models with many firms, in particular SMEs, having inadequate flexibility and buffers to deal with a prolonged crisis. Innovation dynamics will depend on many factors, including which firms will be able to participate in the recovery. Ensuring the recovery of smaller firms and expanding opportunities for displaced workers in the most affected sectors will address some of the social pressures generated by the Covid-19 crisis.

     

    Policy approaches adopted to address the Covid-19 crisis will shape the recovery. The Covid-19 crisis puts in question whether the emphasis on efficiency in the operation, management and outcomes of various economic and social systems makes sense in a world of system interdependencies. Striving for efficiency gains and rapid growth arguably intensified the magnitude of the shock of Covid-19 on the economy. Just-in-time production increased efficiency but value chains were vulnerable to a range of demand and supply shocks, with the closure of Chinese and then other factories severely disrupting global production. Reductions in emergency care capacities to lower health service costs led to inadequate preparation when the Covid-19 health crisis required quickly increasing capacities to treat severe cases. The crisis also exposes system-wide failures that result from strong interdependencies of the global economy. Thinking in terms of systems rather than autonomous individual entities is consequently essential, as is effective interactions between diverse actors of the STI system. Such systems approaches are not new to STI policy thinking and are part of the major contributions of the first works conducted by the TIP Working Party. However, applying systems perspectives to the post-Covid-19 STI policy agenda is not straightforward and requires re-thinking established modes of operating.

     

    In view of these rapid and complex changes, what are the most important short- and long-term opportunities and risks for STI systems? What should be the STI policy responses and what has proven useful to date? How to achieve economic recovery and build more sustainable, inclusive and resilient systems? Answering to these questions requires adopting a systems perspective and taking into account the diversity of actors engaged and their relative role and position in STI systems.

     

    This virtual workshop organised in two days will gather academics, business representatives, policy makers and practitioners to discuss about the short-term impacts and longer-term opportunities and challenges of the Covid-19 crisis on STI and the policy responses needed to support economic recovery, and build more sustainable, inclusive and resilience systems.

     

    The workshop is organised by the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy (TIP) jointly with the OECD’s New Approaches to Economic Challenges (NAEC) initiative. The workshop is organised as part of the 2019-20 TIP R&D project, and contributes to OECD-wide efforts in tackling the Covid-19 crisis.

     

    OBJECTIVES OF THE WORKSHOP

     

    • Identify the impacts of Covid-19 crisis on STI systems in the short term, and challenges and opportunities for the longer term
    • Discuss policy approaches adopted across countries to address challenges and leverage opportunities of the Covid-19 crisis on STI systems
    • Discuss the contributions of systems approaches in STI policy making and what tools can facilitate their implementation

     

    AGENDA

     

    DAY 1- Wednesday, 17 June 2020

     

    12h00 (Paris time): Registration in Zoom

     

    12h30-12h45: Welcome and Introduction

     

    Workshop chair: Göran Marklund, Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development at VINNOVA and Chair of the OECD TIP Working Party

     

    Introductions to the workshop:

    • Alessandra Colecchia, Head of Science and Technology Policy Division, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation
    • Caroline Paunov, Head of Secretariat for the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

     

    12h45 - 14h00: Panel 1. Short-term effects of the Covid-19 crisis on STI

     

    This panel will explore the impacts of Covid-19 crisis on different actors in the STI systems – from businesses (including large firms, SMEs and start-ups), to public research and higher education institutions.

     

    Issues for discussion:

    • What are the effects of the Covid-19 crisis to date on R&D investments and innovation in the private and public side? How has employment in STI been affected?
    • What are the effects of the Covid-19 crisis and notably lockdowns across different firms, sectors and regions? How are the unequal impacts affecting the innovation base of different sectors?
    • What will be the “new normal” for STI in the immediate post-lockdown period? How can STI contribute to a stable recovery?

     

    Initial perspectives from TIP work on the Covid-19 crisis:

     

    Speakers:

    • Caroline Wagner, Milton & Roslyn Wolf Chair of International Affairs, The Ohio State University, United States
    • Dion Wierts, Senior Manager, Global Government and Public Affairs, Philips, The Netherlands
    • Mu Rongping, Director-General of the Institute of Policy and Management and of the Center for Innovation and Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
    • Sacha Wunsch-Vincent, Head of Section, Economics and Statistics Division at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)
    • Naomi Weir, Head of Innovation, Confederation of British Industry (CBI), United Kingdom

     

    14h00-14h15: Break

     

    14h15 – 15h25: Panel 2. What STI policy measures have been adopted?

     

    This panel will discuss what STI policy initiatives could be implemented to best address the short-term challenges and reap the opportunities posed by the Covid-19 crisis on STI. The session will explore policy lessons from the Global Financial Crisis and its aftermath, share evidence of successful ongoing policy experiences and discuss what tailored policy responses are needed across sectors, firms and regions.

     

    Issues for discussion:

    • What policy measures have been adopted to accelerate and improve STI responses to the Covid-19 shock? How successful is international collaboration and deployment of new policy tools?
    • What have been the experiences in dealing with immediate challenges of averting disruption in research, technology and innovation? What can be learned from past responses to shocks, notably from the Global Financial Crisis?
    • What policy considerations are given to differently affected industries, firms, regions, individuals and types of innovation, in view of their potential impacts on innovation dynamics?

     

    Initial perspectives from TIP work on the Covid-19 crisis:

    • Caroline Paunov, Head of Secretariat for the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

     

    Speakers:

    • Julien Guerrier, Director for Policy Development and Coordination, DG Research and Innovation, European Commission
    • Mark Ferguson, Director General of Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland
    • Myong Hwa Lee, Head of National R&D Research Office, Science and Technology Policy Institute (STEPI), Korea
    • Luc Soete, Dean, Institute of European Studies and Vesalius College, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Belgium
    • Hagay Levin, Chief Strategy Officer, Israel Innovation Authority

     

    15h25-15h35: Wrap up

     

     

    DAY 2 - Wednesday, 24 June 2020

     

    12h00 (Paris time): Registration in Zoom

     

    12h30-13h00: Welcome and introduction: The contribution of STI systems to recovery, sustainability, inclusiveness and resilience in the post-Covid-19 world

     

    Workshop chair: Göran Marklund, Deputy Director General and Head of Operational Development at VINNOVA and Chair of the OECD TIP Working Party

     

    • Dirk Pilat, Deputy Director, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation
    • Caroline Paunov, Head of Secretariat for the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation: "Introduction and takeaways from day 1 of the workshop"

     

    This session will provide insights from the work of the OECD’s New Approaches to Economic Challenges (NAEC) Initiative on resilience and the role of systemic approaches in the recovery. It will also discuss the specific roles of STI systems.

     

    • William Hynes, Head of the NAEC Unit, OECD: “New insights from the OECD NAEC work on resilience and systems transformation in the context of Covid-19”

     

    13h00 - 14h10: Panel 3. What are the possible longer-term challenges and opportunities of Covid-19?

     

    This panel will explore the long-term impacts of the Covid-19 crisis on different actors in STI systems – from innovative businesses (including large firms, SMEs and start-ups), to public research and higher education institutions. It will also discuss how science and innovation (and in particular digital innovation) can contribute to the recovery, and the possible implications of the crisis for sustainability and inclusiveness. The panel will also critically discuss the implications for people of different skills and possible unemployment effects resulting from the Covid-19 crisis in relation to STI systems.

     

    Issues for discussion:

    • What are the possible long-term impacts of Covid-19 on R&D investments and innovation? What role will digital innovation play in the economic recovery?
    • What are the opportunities and threats of the current context for STI systems to contribute to sustainability and resilience? Will the Covid-19 crisis lead to more sustainable modes of production? Can automation and digital innovation help build technology resilience to labour supply shocks? What role can science play in building technology resilience?
    • What are the expected long-term impacts of the Covid-19 crisis across different regions, sectors and firms? Will innovation systems be more or less inclusive as a result of the crisis?

     

    Initial perspectives from TIP work on the Covid-19 crisis:

    • Caroline Paunov, Head of Secretariat for the OECD Working Party on Innovation and Technology Policy, OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

     

    Speakers:

    • Xiaolan Fu, Professor and Director of the Technology and Management Centre for Development, Oxford University
    • Gaétan de Rossenfosse, Assistant Professor, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland
    • Reinhilde Veugelers, Full Professor, Department of Management, Strategy and Innovation, KULeuven, Belgium
    • Niklas Gustafsson, Chief Sustainability Officer and Head of Sustainability and Corporate Affairs, Volvo Group
    • Daniele Archibugi, Research Director at the Italian National Research Council and Professor of Innovation, Governance and Public Policy at the University of London
    • Kazuyuki Motohashi, Professor, Technology Management Department, University of Tokyo

     

    14h10-14h25: Break

     

    14h25 – 15h25:  Panel 4. What STI policy approaches and tools for the recovery?

     

    This panel will discuss disruptive STI policy approaches that would be needed to build sustainable, inclusive and resilient recoveries. The session will in particular discuss in what ways a systems perspectives can support policy and how policy should take into account complementarities and trade-offs in building sustainable, inclusive and resilient futures. It will also explore which measures could be used to assess and track the evolution towards more sustainable, inclusive and resilient STI systems.

     

    Issues for discussion:

    • What STI policy measures have been adopted to date to support R&D and innovation in the post-lockdown context? To what extent have these measures looked into opportunities for digital innovation to drive the economic recovery?
    • What are the STI policy priorities in view of supporting the economic recovery and building more sustainable, inclusive and resilient systems? What are possible policy complementarities and trade-offs?
    • What policy approaches does adopting systems perspectives point to? What role can (international) collaboration in research play in building more resilient, sustainable and inclusive systems?
    • What policy tools and measures can help assess and track systems’ resilience, sustainability and inclusiveness (beyond following a pure growth objective)?

     

    Initial perspectives from TIP work on the Covid-19 crisis:

     

    Speakers:

    • Sandrine Dixson-Declève, Co-President of the Club of Rome, Chair of the European Commission Expert Group on Economic and Societal Impact of Research & Innovation and member of the Climate-KIC Advisory Council
    • Pierre Azoulay, Professor at the Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.
    • Susana Borrás, Professor of Innovation and Governance, Copenhagen Business School (CBS)
    • Jonathan Haskel, Professor of Economics at Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London, and External Member of the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee
    • Uwe Cantner, Professor, FSU Jena and University of Southern Denmark/Odense

     

    15h25-15h35: Wrap up